Mean Girls Unpacked: Analyzing Female-to-Female Office Bullying

Okay, so I blogged about crafting the perfect hero yesterday. Yeah. But, while I don’t want to bombard you, heroes without villains often fall flat. In fact, they do. With nothing to fight against, even Thor would end with a flabby sword arm and a rerun of old tales to tell. (Heaven forfend!)

Enter Sean C. Wright, multi-published and absolutely in touch with the mean-girl villain that often strikes outside the office. Extended family anyone?

Check out the details on your next villain–because girls can be just as cutthroat. The sweet smiles and lipstick aren’t fooling anyone. (And thank you Sean for this timely blog. LOVE it!)

Write ON.

Seanarchy

Meangirls

Every woman with a corporate American job has encountered this rattlesnake in high heels. She is cold or overly critical to certain female colleagues, or worse, both. She engages in gossip and triangulation. She thrives on other women’s tears and sleepless nights that she causes. She won’t just do her job and go home, and refuses to let other women do the same. Because she is addicted to drama like some are to Starbucks. She and others like her exhibit the flipside of toxic masculinity.

They are the office mean girls.

It’s a shame that we are disgusted with bullying, and have a zero-tolerance attitude about it among children in school. But for some reason, it’s still alive and well in the office. And this is not to say that men don’t bully. They do. We have all heard of – or worked for – the “abusive genius” or “brilliant…

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Digging into History: A Writer’s Guide to the Perfect Hero

Humans LOVE a hero! Times change, but people don’t. Contrary to what some believe, we’re all born with a human nature that binds us together, forcing us to grow and learn. But along the way, academic progress notwithstanding, mankind has always enjoyed a vicarious thrill. Humans love to cheer champions who pull off glorious feats …

Continue reading Digging into History: A Writer’s Guide to the Perfect Hero

Should I continue with my novel even though there’s a published novel with a similar plot?

But that’s been done before! What’s a writer to do?

If you’re plagued by doubt about your current novel, read on. Another nugget of wisdom from multi-published Forget Me Not Romances author, Florence Witkop, awaits. Her straight-shooting advice will help calm the creative waters so your words can FLOW.

And, please, feel free to follow Florence and yours-truly. We’d love to hear from you. Creative is as creative does. And the muse MUST be fed.

Write on!

Should you continue with plans to write a novel if you find a similar one that’s been written before?

Of course you should!

A publisher — can’t remember which one except that it was in New York City — said that one of his biggest problems was writers who contacted them threatening to sue because they’d submitted an article that was rejected and then, later, the magazine printed a similar article. The point of the publisher’s comment was that it’s common in the publishing world to receive numerous similar submissions. In many cases, some of those rejected submissions were later published elsewhere.

But going deeper into the question of similar plots, there’s a list of story plots that’s easy to find online (because there are a lot of them and all are slightly different) because there are only so many story plots.

The thing that differentiates one story from…

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There’s Something To Be Said for…

If Friday has you needing to stop and take account of the world around you–a writer’s world–look no further. René Penn is here with the thinking man–and woman’s–assessment.

Feel free to follow me and René. Comments, suggestions, and requests are ALWAYS welcome. We’d love to hear from YOU!

Write on.

René Penn

I’m in between writing books. I finished one, and it’s ready for an editor’s critique. In a future post post, I’ll discuss the process that I’m tweaking to start writing my next book.

But for now, I’m reflecting. I’m feeling introspective. I have the Thinking Man pose.

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Several things come to mind. Okay, 8 things.

  • There’s something to be said for starting a manuscript

There are blank pages on a screen or notebook, and writers decide to fill them. Not one page, but dozens, hundreds. It takes courage, imagination, dedication, and a little insanity. But it’s okay. We were born for this.

  • There’s something to celebrate for getting past the middle

Writing through the midpoint has been a quagmire that’s pulled me down. Then it became clear when I read posts like this one by Now Novel and this funny, insightful one by Chuck Wendig. The solution is one…

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TBT Book Spotlight: Under This Same Sky — Toni Shiloh

It’s Throwback Thursday, Reader Friends! Today’s book spotlight features Cynthia Roemer’s Under this Same Sky. Released last year in April, this historical romance takes place in 1854. Have you read it? About the Book ~ She thought she’d lost everything ~ Instead she found what she needed most. ~ Illinois ~ 1854 Becky Hollister wants …

Continue reading TBT Book Spotlight: Under This Same Sky — Toni Shiloh

Star Trek Discovery – The Second Season

Trekkie fans. I KNOW you’re outFERENGI there. If you follow my blog — GREAT — if not, I hope you will. But for all things Star Trek, I’d be a real a real Ferengi if I didn’t share my latest find — SPACE TIME Magazine. (Life doesn’t revolve around profit!)

Alexa Wayne is ready and willing to get you jazzed about the franchise’s still new STAR TREK: Discovery – Because exploration IS logical!

Please, join me in venturing into this brave new world. (I have yet to convince the family to try Discovery. It took us nearly a decade to watch, then binge Deep Space 9. OH, what fun!)

And if you’re looking for writerly tips, they’re here in spades. STAR TREK is a successful franchise to be STUDIED. How to create characters? Steep interest? Carry threads from one glorious galactic exploration to the next. It’s all there. Have fun and…

Write on!

Space Time Magazine

The series follows the crew of the USS Discovery as they encounter new worlds and civilizations, delving into familiar themes and expanding upon an incident that has been talked about within the franchise’s universe but never fully explored. — Google

The Anticipation

Many people wondered about Captain Gabriel Lorca and if his death was final. After all, it is now the favorite thing to do in series. Ever since Game of Thrones, the death of many unsuspected leading roles became a “hot” thing to do. It is almost an expectation strangely with the viewers.

However, it seemed that before the season finale, the crew of the USS Discovery moved on with Captain Suru at the cons. Then again, we did hear the iconic music that started the Star Trek adventure more than fifty years ago. We did see the legendary numbers NCC 1701.

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