What are some tips on writing novellas?

Are you reading a novella or wanting to write one? Check in with Winged Publication’s own Florence Witkop for the scoop on how its done.

Write on!

A novella falls into what used to be a creative desert between short stories and full length novels. No more.

People don’t always want to give the time to reading a novel that it requires, especially since novels are getting longer and longer and longer until sometimes a reader can measure a book’s thickness in inches! And yet, , though they don’t want to spend so much time, they often want a story with more depth than is possible in a short story.

Enter the novella. Here’s what it is and what to know when writing one:

  1. It’s normally between 20,000 and 30,000 words long though different publishers may have different length requirements that better fit their own business model.

2. It’s a straight-line, single subject story.

3. If plot twists or sub-plots are essential to the story they will be kept to an absolute minimum and will not be…

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How to Write a Great Blog Post: A Beginner’s Guide

So you want to write a blog? A good one.

GREAT.

Where there’s a will, there IS a way. The internet only improves with quality content and engaging bloggers. But there’s often a lot of bruising that comes with trying something new. Who wants to sign on board to be beat up in a public forum or worse — ignored.

So, if you don’t fancy being that guy, check in with Cristian Mihai at The Art of Blogging. The bite-sized breakdown of what makes a good blog post is there to smooth the way. For you and your readers. (Mine, too ;^)

You don’t want to miss it!

Write on…

The Art of Blogging

There are more blogs in existence than ever, yet more and more people are seduced by the idea of sharing their thoughts and ideas with the rest of the world.

As a matter of fact, it does seem as if there’s a war out there. Everyone is fighting for attention, there are so many things to learn and master. So many social networks, marketing techniques. There’s even an awful lot of content on blogging itself, which makes it even more frustrating.

How do you write a great blog post?

I wouldn’t be asking if I didn’t know the answer. Or would I …

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Sorry, but Good Content Alone Isn’t Enough

Are you eager for a blog that blooms? Keep reading. Cristian Mihai at The Art of Blogging has the straight dope about what you need to do…. even if doing it makes you feel sleazy.

So relax, read on, and follow AnnMalleyBooks.com. Absolutely follow The Art of Blogging. Your future readers will thank you!

Write on

The Art of Blogging

Content is king” is good advice, but I hate to disappoint… just delivering great content isn’t going to get you your first avid fans.

Facebook groups will, though. Networkingwith other bloggers in your niche will. Going where the conversation is and providing real value in the form of opinions will.

And, weirdly enough, this is the type of stuff that makes one feel sleazy. It feels disingenuous to reply to folks who share their opinions on the web, or to comment on someone’s post just so they can comment on yours.

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Tudor History | Queen Mary I Of England’s Letters of Reconciliation To King Henry VIII

Dry my eyes or let the tears flow. I’m torn. This reconciliation of father and daughter–contrived as it was–saved the life of Queen Mary I of England. But it’s the motive behind the missive that strikes a chord.

The words of Catherine of Aragon — a steadfast WIFE and MOTHER as ever there were — will move the hardest heart.

Would that such a love of God and duty prevailed today.

Thank you HISTORICAL DIARIES for keeping us grounded.

Write on!

THE HISTORICAL DIARIES

Queen Mary of England was the daughter of King Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon. She was born at Greenwich on February 18th, 1516. Mary’s life was troubled early on with the public divorce and multiple marriage disasters of her father King Henry.

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4 Things I Work On When I Start a Novel, Part 2

Are you still struggling with that new novel? Then check out Part 2 in René Penn’s “4 Things I Work on When I Start a Novel.” You don’t want to miss it.

She’s that good!

Write on.

René Penn

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Last week, I blogged part one of this topic. Please check it out, if you haven’t already, because the list below piggybacks on part one.

Here are four more things I work on when I start writing a novel.

1. Stuff That Can Go Wrong list

I created this concept after banging my head over ways to create tension in a previous story. I heard critique partners say, “Ramp up the conflict” or “Raise the stakes.” But I couldn’t figure out how.

Then I thought, what are some of the worst things that could go wrong for this character? And voila, the aptly titled, Stuff That Can Go Wrong list was born.

With a WIP, I work on this list after I’ve sorted out the Goal-Motivation-Conflict of the story. It’s an unedited, no-hold-barred, rambling mess of ideas that keeps the protagonist’s bum on the hot seat. It also helps me identify…

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4 Things I Work On When I Start a Novel

Are you starting your novel? Wondering where to begin?

Check in with my pal, René Penn, for a reality check on how to tackle that beast. Having a defined process is such a blessing. So take the load off and let your creativity fly.

Write on!

René Penn

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As I begin writing my next book, I thought it might be cool to share how I start the process. Also, I’d love to hear what steps YOU take when you start a new manuscript.

But enough about you. Back to me…

Screen Shot 2019-04-18 at 1.26.22 PM.png What was I thinking about? Oh yes, world domination.

With every new writing project, I’ve been fine-tuning my approach. I’ve got an attack plan now, and the list below is it.

Disclaimer: I’m no expert on writing a book and haven’t been published. Here, I’m sharing what I learn and struggle with as I work toward the goal of improving my craft and getting published.

There’s a bit of bad news with this list, though. I still struggle. It’s coming a bit easier. But there are things I’m working on that will, hopefully, make my manuscripts better.

1. GMC

Goal-Motivation-Conflict, or GMC for short. When I learned this…

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Mean Girls Unpacked: Analyzing Female-to-Female Office Bullying

Okay, so I blogged about crafting the perfect hero yesterday. Yeah. But, while I don’t want to bombard you, heroes without villains often fall flat. In fact, they do. With nothing to fight against, even Thor would end with a flabby sword arm and a rerun of old tales to tell. (Heaven forfend!)

Enter Sean C. Wright, multi-published and absolutely in touch with the mean-girl villain that often strikes outside the office. Extended family anyone?

Check out the details on your next villain–because girls can be just as cutthroat. The sweet smiles and lipstick aren’t fooling anyone. (And thank you Sean for this timely blog. LOVE it!)

Write ON.

Seanarchy

Meangirls

Every woman with a corporate American job has encountered this rattlesnake in high heels. She is cold or overly critical to certain female colleagues, or worse, both. She engages in gossip and triangulation. She thrives on other women’s tears and sleepless nights that she causes. She won’t just do her job and go home, and refuses to let other women do the same. Because she is addicted to drama like some are to Starbucks. She and others like her exhibit the flipside of toxic masculinity.

They are the office mean girls.

It’s a shame that we are disgusted with bullying, and have a zero-tolerance attitude about it among children in school. But for some reason, it’s still alive and well in the office. And this is not to say that men don’t bully. They do. We have all heard of – or worked for – the “abusive genius” or “brilliant…

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