Writing Tip: STOP Writing

Ready, get set, STOP WRITING!

No, seriously. If you want to write well, check out this must read by short story novelist and reading enthusiast Kayla Ann. Published and well on her way to holding a Masters in English/Creative writing, she gets the impulse to forge on.

What serious writer doesn’t?

The MUSE is demanding if nothing else. She can also hide a great many warts that we writers will not see if we rush to get our darlings out the door. Don’t believe me? Read on…and I hope you’ll join me in following Kayla Ann.

Write on!

KaylaAnn

“Stop writing?!”

“But Kayla,” you may ask me, “how can you tell me to stop writing? Shouldn’t we keep writing? After all, we are writers! How can we be writers if we are not writing? How does stopping our writing actually help our writing? Isn’t that contradictory?”

Image result for girl you crazy gif

Now before you turn away from me and shake your head in disgust, hear me out.

I’m not saying that we should stop all writing. I am saying that you should stop working on the project you’re currently working on once you have finished it. For writers there is this huge urge that once we finally finish a project we automatically want to go back through, edit, and send it to a publisher. It’s just not realistic guys. In order for a work to be good you need to utilize the power of distance.

Now some of you may be wondering…

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Should I continue with my novel even though there’s a published novel with a similar plot?

But that’s been done before! What’s a writer to do?

If you’re plagued by doubt about your current novel, read on. Another nugget of wisdom from multi-published Forget Me Not Romances author, Florence Witkop, awaits. Her straight-shooting advice will help calm the creative waters so your words can FLOW.

And, please, feel free to follow Florence and yours-truly. We’d love to hear from you. Creative is as creative does. And the muse MUST be fed.

Write on!

Should you continue with plans to write a novel if you find a similar one that’s been written before?

Of course you should!

A publisher — can’t remember which one except that it was in New York City — said that one of his biggest problems was writers who contacted them threatening to sue because they’d submitted an article that was rejected and then, later, the magazine printed a similar article. The point of the publisher’s comment was that it’s common in the publishing world to receive numerous similar submissions. In many cases, some of those rejected submissions were later published elsewhere.

But going deeper into the question of similar plots, there’s a list of story plots that’s easy to find online (because there are a lot of them and all are slightly different) because there are only so many story plots.

The thing that differentiates one story from…

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Beta Readers, CPs and Self-Editing

Walk away, Renée–that Left Banke ’60’s classic–was a memorable song from my growing up. Why? I was almost named Renée–far more exotic than Ann, but there you go. My mom cooked plain food, too.

As fate would have it, though, I’m not able to walk away.

Good thing or else I’d be missing out! So here I am with another insightful Renée–aspiring author Renée Hurteau–whose on point advice for writers is absolutely golden.

Write on!

R.F. Hurteau

I open my file, glance with trepidation at the myriad red marks and comment bubbles throughout, and promptly close it again.  I just can’t.  Not right now.

Instead, I thought this might be a good time to share some of my thoughts on editing for any of my fellow writers that have found their way here.

Editing, a crucial element to any good story, is difficult.  In the beginning, when you first finish writing and hand it off eagerly to third parties for their feedback, it sometimes can seem like a personal affront when their constructive criticism comes back.  However, you shouldn’t take it as one!  Constructive criticism is vital to a story that people can immerse themselves in.  One misspelled word, one convoluted, hard to read sentence, is enough to jar them out of a state of suspended disbelief.  What about that small but glaring plot hole you missed?…

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Interview with Kathy Douglass about her book, “How to Steal the Lawman’s Heart”

Kathy Douglass

If you like great stories, you’ll love DIVERSITY BETWEEN THE PAGES. Check in with multi-published Forget Me Not Romances author Alexis Goring as she interviews lawyer-turned-writer Kathy Douglass about How To Steal the Lawman’s Heart. Her latest Harlequin Special Edition release.

Get inspired.

And run with the truth that a beating heart that can forgive, embrace today, and learn to love again is what binds us all.

Write on!

Diversity Between the Pages

Good Monday Morning, reader friends!

Today, we’re interviewing Kathy Douglass again. This time, we’re talking about another one of her books. This one is titled, How to Steal the Lawman’s Heart.

Enjoy!


Interview with Kathy Douglass about her book,  How to Steal the Lawman’s Heart:

Alexis: Why did you write this book?

Kathy: I wrote this book because the characters called to me. The idea began floating through my mind and I couldn’t rest until I put their story on paper.

Alexis: What do you want readers to take away from this story? Why?

Kathy: I want readers to understand that no matter what happened in the past, you have to move forward. Trent had a wonderful wife and a truly happy life ripped away from him without warning. It was hard for him to let go of the happy memories or the bitterness at losing it all…

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Why Matilda of Flanders Was William The Conqueror’s Perfect Match

Looking for a real woman from the pages of history? Someone to drain the sap out of revisionist fantasies of fainting maidens? Seek no more!

Matilda of Flanders is your gal. Bold in word and deed, this woman made up her own mind–and changed it when she pleased. Crossing parents, popes, and even William the Conqueror.

Read on to get the scoop from the insightful and always entertaining Samantha James, host of The Historical Diaries.

Write on!

THE HISTORICAL DIARIES

Matilda of Flanders was a crowned Queen Consort of England. She was the wife of William the Conqueror and was his match in every way imaginable.

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Too many manuscripts

Have endless revisions already got you down this New Year? Check in with multi-published Forget Me Not Romance author, Florence Witkop, for some straight shooting advice to keep it simple.

Write on!

Someone recently asked how I organize differing versions of my current manuscript. Because manuscripts change. Stories change. And those changes mean manuscripts change and must be organized so a writer knows which is the best one. This is something I struggled with for a long time. Years. And more years. Until I figured it out.

Since I work on a computer, I must save my work. I used to always add the words ‘latest version’ to the end of whatever the name of the work is that I was saving. And, of course, the date was always available to see which of several versions was the last one that I worked on and that was usually the one that I wanted.

That’s what I did and I was really proud of myself for being so smart.

Then I got really smart.

Now I simply, ruthlessly delete everything so there’s only…

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