Star Trek Discovery – The Second Season

Trekkie fans. I KNOW you’re outFERENGI there. If you follow my blog — GREAT — if not, I hope you will. But for all things Star Trek, I’d be a real a real Ferengi if I didn’t share my latest find — SPACE TIME Magazine. (Life doesn’t revolve around profit!)

Alexa Wayne is ready and willing to get you jazzed about the franchise’s still new STAR TREK: Discovery – Because exploration IS logical!

Please, join me in venturing into this brave new world. (I have yet to convince the family to try Discovery. It took us nearly a decade to watch, then binge Deep Space 9. OH, what fun!)

And if you’re looking for writerly tips, they’re here in spades. STAR TREK is a successful franchise to be STUDIED. How to create characters? Steep interest? Carry threads from one glorious galactic exploration to the next. It’s all there. Have fun and…

Write on!

Space Time Magazine

The series follows the crew of the USS Discovery as they encounter new worlds and civilizations, delving into familiar themes and expanding upon an incident that has been talked about within the franchise’s universe but never fully explored. — Google

The Anticipation

Many people wondered about Captain Gabriel Lorca and if his death was final. After all, it is now the favorite thing to do in series. Ever since Game of Thrones, the death of many unsuspected leading roles became a “hot” thing to do. It is almost an expectation strangely with the viewers.

However, it seemed that before the season finale, the crew of the USS Discovery moved on with Captain Suru at the cons. Then again, we did hear the iconic music that started the Star Trek adventure more than fifty years ago. We did see the legendary numbers NCC 1701.


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Do I sketch out the plot of my novel before starting it or do I allow my characters to lead the way?

NO fooling. There are different ways to approach a story, but each carries its own consequences.

Check in with Florence Witkop, author of The Man from Yesterday, for some writerly wisdom that could save YOU some serious time. And, please, follow me if you’d like to continue this journey of learning, laughing, and generally having a BLAST. I know I am.

Write on!

There are two ways to write a story. Their proponents are called plotters and pantsers. Plotters sketch the plot before starting the story, pantsers just sit at their computer and start writing, letting the characters tell them what comes next.

Both are fine. Depends on which kind of person you are. And how you want to spend your writing time.

Plotters spend a lot of time discovering their characters and their story before they write so when they sit down at their computers, all they have to do is tell the story.

Pantsers don’t do that but they spend a whole lot more time writing. It’s estimated that a finished novel goes through 10 rewrites before being published. That figure would be less if pantsers weren’t included. But pantsers don’t…

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Slow and Steady: Writer’s Life Lessons from the Oldest Animal on Earth!

Which are YOU? Slow and steady wins the race. How often have you heard that tortoise and the hare reference? I’ve lived with it my whole life since I have a fascination with shelled babies. And yet a tendency to go wild-hare trips me up too often. (Remember, I’m the one who almost stomped her …

Continue reading Slow and Steady: Writer’s Life Lessons from the Oldest Animal on Earth!

Beta Readers, CPs and Self-Editing

Walk away, Renée–that Left Banke ’60’s classic–was a memorable song from my growing up. Why? I was almost named Renée–far more exotic than Ann, but there you go. My mom cooked plain food, too.

As fate would have it, though, I’m not able to walk away.

Good thing or else I’d be missing out! So here I am with another insightful Renée–aspiring author Renée Hurteau–whose on point advice for writers is absolutely golden.

Write on!

Out of Context

I open my file, glance with trepidation at the myriad red marks and comment bubbles throughout, and promptly close it again.  I just can’t.  Not right now.

Instead, I thought this might be a good time to share some of my thoughts on editing for any of my fellow writers that have found their way here.

Editing, a crucial element to any good story, is difficult.  In the beginning, when you first finish writing and hand it off eagerly to third parties for their feedback, it sometimes can seem like a personal affront when their constructive criticism comes back.  However, you shouldn’t take it as one!  Constructive criticism is vital to a story that people can immerse themselves in.  One misspelled word, one convoluted, hard to read sentence, is enough to jar them out of a state of suspended disbelief.  What about that small but glaring plot hole you missed?…

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Rain, rain go away! What moves you to write?

It’s raining in Northern Virginia—again. This would be welcome news if the summer had been sizzling as summers are supposed to be. I should be cranking about my brown lawn about now.  We don’t have a drip system outside of God’s garden hose and yours truly so a brownish lawn is typically where it's at …

Continue reading Rain, rain go away! What moves you to write?