Sit-down with Lana Higginbotham: Get to know the spirit behind the stories

The awesome strength of nature is amazing to behold. Hey guys. I hope everyone is enjoying the shift in seasons and that nasty weather is on the decline. (We had a corker lightning storm Saturday night. Full on cracking, white light flashing in the wee hours. Lovely. But I'm weird that way.) Meanwhile, I'm back …

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Do I sketch out the plot of my novel before starting it or do I allow my characters to lead the way?

NO fooling. There are different ways to approach a story, but each carries its own consequences.

Check in with Florence Witkop, author of The Man from Yesterday, for some writerly wisdom that could save YOU some serious time. And, please, follow me if you’d like to continue this journey of learning, laughing, and generally having a BLAST. I know I am.

Write on!

There are two ways to write a story. Their proponents are called plotters and pantsers. Plotters sketch the plot before starting the story, pantsers just sit at their computer and start writing, letting the characters tell them what comes next.

Both are fine. Depends on which kind of person you are. And how you want to spend your writing time.

Plotters spend a lot of time discovering their characters and their story before they write so when they sit down at their computers, all they have to do is tell the story.

Pantsers don’t do that but they spend a whole lot more time writing. It’s estimated that a finished novel goes through 10 rewrites before being published. That figure would be less if pantsers weren’t included. But pantsers don’t…

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11 Things to Do With a DNF Writing Project

NaNoWriMo is over and done. 2018 is nearing its last hoorah. The time for setting 2019 goals is almost here. We writer’s NEED them.

But, if you’re panicking about last year’s lovelies, those unfinished darlings more commonly called WIPs, don’t. The dreaded DID NOT FINISH doesn’t need to get you down.

Check in with the always witty, René Penn, author of the Bachelorette Blogger serial for some perspective. Her light side approach to the dreaded DNF is sure to make you chuckle and help you . . .

Write on!

Rene Penn

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A few months ago, I learned about the term DNF, Did Not Finish, in the context of reading books. It’s when someone loses interests in a book they’re reading and never makes it to the end.

Funny thing is, we writers have this DNF experience with our own writing. Don’t we?

I know I’ve amassed a pile of DNF writing projects over the years. I just added to it again last month, which is probably why this has been on my mind.

From my previous post, Our Stories Are Like Socks, where I discussed the oddball similarities between socks and stories…

“Don’t get stuck on a story that’s the wrong fit, that has holes, and is sagging at key points. Even if you’ve tried to mend it, patch it, or hold it up with story suspenders, there comes a point when you know that there’s no saving it.”

So…

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Tomb Raider—Egyptian style

Think Laura Croft has tagged all the tombs? Think again, and don’t kid yourself. My history freak is absolutely blog worthy. Even for an inspy suspense/romance writer. Hidden bones, exotic lands, and ancient civilizations are the stuff of stories—contemporary and historical. Welcome to the tomb of Wahtye! And this is a doozie. An archeological expedition, …

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Designer Babies or Science Slaves?

Okay, I write inspired romantic suspense, but this latest scary tech has my mind reeling. Reeling with potential horror stories, but not fiction. He jiankui wants to stop AIDS Sputniknewsreports, “He Jiankui, a researcher from Shenzhen, announced in an interview with AP news agency that he had recently helped the first twin girls (Lulu and Nana) with modified DNA …

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The patient’s flat-lining. Conflict—STAT!

NaNoWriMo. Sounds great for some. But the courtship is over. The thrill—disgusting word—is gone. No write-in, no word-sprint can revive the magic. The patient is bleeding out and pulling the plug is the only mercy. The daily pain is too fresh, too real, too stark a reminder of all that we writer’s did…and failed to …

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Hashtags—A Writer’s Best Buddy. No, really.

If you’re new to writing, you may think being an author means focusing on the words. Crafting stories. Tucking away in that haven of letting others do the heavy lifting of marketing your genius. That used to be me. That still is me when I allow myself fantasy time. The words are the most important. …

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