Care and Feeding of Roses: Not Your Everyday Garden Guide

David Austin Lady of Shalott rose. I love, love, love it! Do you want to bloom? Reach your peak? Do you want passersby to stop and admire those showy blooms and drink in that intoxicating fragrance? It all begins with proper care and feeding. That’s right. Authors are like rose bushes, roots dug deep into …

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Do I sketch out the plot of my novel before starting it or do I allow my characters to lead the way?

NO fooling. There are different ways to approach a story, but each carries its own consequences.

Check in with Florence Witkop, author of The Man from Yesterday, for some writerly wisdom that could save YOU some serious time. And, please, follow me if you’d like to continue this journey of learning, laughing, and generally having a BLAST. I know I am.

Write on!

There are two ways to write a story. Their proponents are called plotters and pantsers. Plotters sketch the plot before starting the story, pantsers just sit at their computer and start writing, letting the characters tell them what comes next.

Both are fine. Depends on which kind of person you are. And how you want to spend your writing time.

Plotters spend a lot of time discovering their characters and their story before they write so when they sit down at their computers, all they have to do is tell the story.

Pantsers don’t do that but they spend a whole lot more time writing. It’s estimated that a finished novel goes through 10 rewrites before being published. That figure would be less if pantsers weren’t included. But pantsers don’t…

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First They Came for My Mattress: Out with the old!

The Grinch is at it again, not skulking back to his hidey-hole on Mt. Crumpet as is proper come New Years.  The furred menace is targeting my desk this time. My trusty chair, too. But, if I’m honest, the set isn’t mine. Oh, the glory of goldenrod and olive green The spindly number—where I often …

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11 Things to Do With a DNF Writing Project

NaNoWriMo is over and done. 2018 is nearing its last hoorah. The time for setting 2019 goals is almost here. We writer’s NEED them.

But, if you’re panicking about last year’s lovelies, those unfinished darlings more commonly called WIPs, don’t. The dreaded DID NOT FINISH doesn’t need to get you down.

Check in with the always witty, René Penn, author of the Bachelorette Blogger serial for some perspective. Her light side approach to the dreaded DNF is sure to make you chuckle and help you . . .

Write on!

René Penn

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A few months ago, I learned about the term DNF, Did Not Finish, in the context of reading books. It’s when someone loses interests in a book they’re reading and never makes it to the end.

Funny thing is, we writers have this DNF experience with our own writing. Don’t we?

I know I’ve amassed a pile of DNF writing projects over the years. I just added to it again last month, which is probably why this has been on my mind.

From my previous post, Our Stories Are Like Socks, where I discussed the oddball similarities between socks and stories…

“Don’t get stuck on a story that’s the wrong fit, that has holes, and is sagging at key points. Even if you’ve tried to mend it, patch it, or hold it up with story suspenders, there comes a point when you know that there’s no saving it.”

So…

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